Part 1: Preparing your rod to catch greatness; how to set up your social media to hook the best candidates

Part 1: Preparing your rod to catch greatness; how to set up your social media to hook the best candidates

A 4-part series about social marketing for the savvy recruiter

At Kinetix, we waste no time getting our new recruiters set up to tackle the digital networking frontier and teeing them up for social success. But what if you don’t have a designated recruitment marketing team to help brand your profiles to perfection? Luckily for you, this 4-part series is here to help.

Think about this: Every good fisherman wants to hook at least one rare 20lb bass in their lifetime, right? Except… it isn’t an easy task to catch one though. How does this relate to recruiting? Because it’s just as difficult (if not more so) finding the recruitment industry’s illusive “purple squirrel.” So, to go along with the fishing analogy, in this series we’ll be referring to the ideal candidate as the “big purple bass.”

Catchy, right? Let’s dive in.

In order to catch this beautiful purple bass, you’re going to need the right fishing rods and the best sourcing spots. The greater number of rods you have and the more places you have to source, the better chance you have of catching the right fish. It’s just simple logic.

Finding the big purple bass – AKA – sourcing the best candidates: Here’s how it’s done:

First, you’re going to want to start by creating profiles on more than one social site. We aren’t just talking the traditional LinkedIn set up. You need to get out there and be as real and accessible as possible. So, get comfortable navigating Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram where there are big pools of talent just waiting to be reeled in.

When you create your additional social profiles, one of the first things you should do is pick a great picture that will help candidates put a face to name, voice, and email address. Picking a photo that is professional and flattering is essential. No beer bottles or feather boas please. A clean backdrop with a shoulder up frame is just the ticket.

Get “profersonal.” Let us explain:

On to the summary. Link your company, give some detail about yourself, your job, and your organization in this description section of Facebook or LinkedIn. Besides a kick-butt profile pic and a descriptive bio on your LinkedIn, you’ll need to create a tagline to go next to your photo. You can use the same tagline for Twitter and Instagram, if you think it’s worthy. Keep in mind you only get a few phrases here, so this is your chance to show your personality.

Our little rule here at Kinetix is to include 2 parts professional and 2 parts personal in your tagline – AKA – “profersonal.” Your title is important to add to the tagline, but we suggest you put something you love about being a recruiter as well, like “Purple Squirrel Hunter” or “Master Head Hunter.” The last two tags can be related to your interests, for example, “Kitten Connoisseur” or “Marathon Junkie,” but please refrain from inappropriate (and unoriginal) tags like “Female Body Inspector.”—there must be limits, ya know? So begin with 2 professional tags, end with with 2 personal tags, and move on. Done and done.

There will be a section below for education, location, and past gigs on LinkedIn and Facebook for you to add some background on yourself. This is your chance to go more into detail about published articles, cities, and even that sweet certification you earned last year. Feel free to list out a few interests and causes you care about in the sections that ask for them. Adding that information can only help validate your personal brand.

Pretty easy, wouldn’t you say? 

Congratulations, you are all set up and one step closer to catching your big purple bass. Stay tuned for next week’s blog, where we will talk about posting the right content to reel in the best talent and connecting with potential candidates.

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